Custom Search
Top Stories
Go to Site Index See "Top Stories" main page
REPORTING · 12th July 2010
Merv Ritchie
The above picture was a taken in Patagonia, Argentina yesterday as the moon moved directly into the center of the path of the sun. A full and complete, total solar eclipse.

This is the home town of Jamie Schectman who arrived in Terrace last October to help develop and promote the Shames Mountain Ski Hill. The attention brought to Terrace by this outsider was reflected in the numerous articles printed in magazines and newspapers across the globe and our web stats from November, which as our numbers continue to rise we are only now able to match again.

The entire South Pacific had a view of the July 11 eclipse. It was a 5-hour event and the region was completely enveloped in the Moon's shadow for 4 minutes. The great feature of an eclipse is how the solar corona (the sun rays) are revealed. Janne Pyykkö took the above picture from a hill overlooking Lago Argentino in Patagonia, Argentina and wrote;

"The eclipse was not easy to catch here because the total phase occurred at sunset when the sun was only 1o above the horizon," he says. "To increase my chances, I hiked to a hill 400 meters above the lake and there it was! The eclipse was easy to see just above the usually-cloudy Andes. I was very lucky indeed."
The Terrace Daily Webstats continue to climb and are only this past June achieving the bump caused by Jamie Schectman bringing international attention to Terrace and the  Shames Mountain Ski Hill.
The Terrace Daily Webstats continue to climb and are only this past June achieving the bump caused by Jamie Schectman bringing international attention to Terrace and the Shames Mountain Ski Hill.
Physics professor Patricia Reiff of Rice University witnessed the eclipse from the deck of the Aranui 3 cruise ship just off the coast of Tahiti.
Physics professor Patricia Reiff of Rice University witnessed the eclipse from the deck of the Aranui 3 cruise ship just off the coast of Tahiti.
Here is what the Earth looks like during a solar eclipse. The shadow of the Moon can be seen darkening part of Earth. Only observers near the center of the dark circle see a total solar eclipse. -NASA
Here is what the Earth looks like during a solar eclipse. The shadow of the Moon can be seen darkening part of Earth. Only observers near the center of the dark circle see a total solar eclipse. -NASA
The above picture is a combination of thirty-three photographs that were digitally processed to highlight faint features of a total eclipse that occurred in March of 2006. Photo by - Koen van Gorp
The above picture is a combination of thirty-three photographs that were digitally processed to highlight faint features of a total eclipse that occurred in March of 2006. Photo by - Koen van Gorp