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REPORTING · 16th April 2010
Merv Ritchie
Media reports today are expressing concerns about the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline and the export of raw bitumen after Skeena Bulkley Valley MP Nathan Cullen raised questions about the environmental impacts and the effects that come with the export of the raw resource.

Some are claiming the Federal Government may restrict the shipping of the Tar Sands Crude to jurisdictions with lower environmental standards and this would include China. This therefore calls into question the ability of China to invest in the Tar Sands and the viability of the pipeline being proposed for bring the crude to the port at Kitimat.

Nathan In the House April 15, 2010

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena-Bulkley Valley, NDP):


Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's decision to export raw bitumen means that this government will be exporting our jobs to other countries. Jobs in the refining industry are at risk throughout Canada. This decision also puts our energy security in jeopardy.

Why is the government forcing Canada to deal with all the environmental and social problems related to tar sands operations, but exporting the jobs?

Mr. Mike Lake (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry, CPC):

Mr. Speaker, the federal government will review Sinopec's bid, as it does with any other foreign investment. Under the Investment Canada Act, the acquisition of control by a foreign investor of a Canadian business with assets of $299 million or more is subject to review.
As the hon. member knows, the minister only approves applications where an investment demonstrates that it is likely to be of net benefit to Canada.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena-Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Mr. Speaker, Canadians want a government that will stand up for our interests, not one that surrenders our natural wealth to every foreign investor that comes along.

The Prime Minister is breaking his own fundamental promise not to export raw bitumen to countries with lower environmental standards. He is exporting raw resources and Canadian jobs. He is helping triple the tar sands production and rubber-stamping more pipelines that will carry unrefined crude to the U.S. and China. Canada will be left with all the pollution and a government only interested in making friends in Texas and Beijing.

Why is the Prime Minister breaking his own promise to Canadians?

Mr. Mike Lake (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry, CPC):

Mr. Speaker, notwithstanding the hon. member's rhetoric, any business, any company that operates in Canada operates under Canadian law.

I will reiterate that the minister only approves applications where an investment demonstrates that it is likely to be of net benefit to Canada. The review process is rigorous, involves consultations with affected provinces and territories and other key stakeholders.

From the Globe and Mail Linked HERE

April 15, 2010
Ottawa Puts up Barrier to Bitumen Exports
The Globe And Mail
Thu Apr 15 2010
By Shawn McCarthy


Ottawa says it will use its regulatory power to stop Chinese state- controlled Sinopec from exporting raw oil sands bitumen and refining it abroad to take advantage of looser climate-change rules.

Sinopec - China's largest refiner - has agreed to pay $4.65-billion (U.S.) to acquire ConocoPhillips' 9-per-cent stake in the Syncrude oil sands project. Under the Syncrude partnership agreement, the seven owners each receive a portion of production to be marketed as they see fit.

But the Harper government vowed during the 2008 election campaign that it would prevent any company from exporting raw bitumen - unprocessed oil from the oil sands - for upgrading elsewhere in order to capitalize on lower greenhouse gas emission rules.

Yesterday, the government stood by that promise.